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jvs:fscan:overview [2012/02/01 19:10]
voyvodic
jvs:fscan:overview [2014/08/04 16:03] (current)
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-• Workspaces – Data are organized within fScan in “io_sets” and “workspaces”. An io_set is loosely defined as a multidimensional collection of neighboring values, typically read from a single file or closely linked set of files. For example, an io_set can contain a single 2-dimensional image, or it can contain a 3-D, 4-D, 5-D or even 6-D series of images,  ​a 3D surface, or physiological time series data. The values in an io_set share a common spatial and temporal coordinate system. A workspace can contain any number of related io_sets. Each io_set within a workspace is associated with spatial transformation specifications so that within a workspace all io_sets can be aligned to a common coordinate system. Figure 2 shows an example of multiple io_sets in a single workspace. Two complete workspaces can be loaded in fScan simultaneously. When two io_sets from different workspaces are then registered to each other, any spatio-temporal point in any io_set can be mapped to the corresponding point in any other io_set. The number of io_sets that can be simultaneously loaded into fScan is typically not limited by the amount of available computer memory. This is because fScan’s memory management is dynamically controlled so that only active images are stored in memory; inactive data buffers are purged automatically when more memory is needed. Newly created io_sets may need to be written out to disk files to facilitate efficient memory usage.+• Workspaces – Data are organized within fScan in “io_sets” and “workspaces”. An io_set is loosely defined as a multidimensional collection of neighboring values, typically read from a single file or closely linked set of files. For example, an io_set can contain a single 2-dimensional image, or it can contain a 3-D, 4-D, 5-D or even 6-D series of images. Or it could contain ​a 3D surface, 3D fiber tracks, or 1-dimensional ​physiological time series data. The values in an io_set share a common spatial and temporal coordinate system. A workspace can contain any number of related io_sets. Each io_set within a workspace is associated with spatial transformation specifications so that within a workspace all io_sets can be aligned to a common coordinate system. Figure 2 shows an example of multiple io_sets in a single workspace. Two complete workspaces can be loaded in fScan simultaneously. When two io_sets from different workspaces are then registered to each other, any spatio-temporal point in any io_set can be mapped to the corresponding point in any other io_set. The number of io_sets that can be simultaneously loaded into fScan is typically not limited by the amount of available computer memory. This is because fScan’s memory management is dynamically controlled so that only active images are stored in memory; inactive data buffers are purged automatically when more memory is needed. Newly created io_sets may need to be written out to disk files to facilitate efficient memory usage.
  
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jvs/fscan/overview.1328123405.txt.gz · Last modified: 2014/08/04 16:03 (external edit)